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The Quick and The Hungry

20-something asexual college gal living it up in the northwestern USA (despite my URL I am sadly niether Danish nor a dinosaur). On this blog are the things I find important; if I'm stepping on any toes, please let me know.

WELCOME.
Sep 2 '14

theskaldspeaks:

thegreenwolf:

thegreenwolf:

xghoststreak:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video

Follow our Tumblr - Like us on Facebook

I thought watermelon just had too much rind and that was wrong until I saw the next gif 

Good. Now will they do one for garlic? I HATE peeling that stuff.

I got something like six messages in my inbox with different ways to peel garlic.

Okay, trick for garlic (cause Greenwolf already got like 6 in their inbox),

take a wide chopping blade, lay the flat over a clove of garlic, hit the flat of the blade hard, basically pops the garlic right out of its paper. 

Sep 2 '14

andillwriteyouatragedy:

guardians of the galaxy + text posts (x)

Sep 1 '14
Sep 1 '14
medievalpoc:

aresnergal:

medievalpoc:

lyricsja:


EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa


Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.
Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.
Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.
A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:


These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.
By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.
 At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu. 
By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s. 


So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.
Also, as an additional consideration:


With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States. 


Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.
It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

Fun fact: I only learned about that library by playing one of the Civilization games where it exists as a wonder

One of the many reasons why Medievalpoc is also about representation in all types of media.
One of the most important ways the past affects us all today is the media we create about it. History is a story, and a story bears the mark of each teller it passes through. So, each time we tell a story, we have the power to shape it as it passes through us, to others.
Whether we’re writing textbooks, fiction, or articles; sharing something on Facebook, teaching a class, playing a game, or texting our moms, we make choices in how we phrase things and frame information. When you hold things in your mind, like the Library of Timbuktu, and think about how it interacts with everything else you know, it will affect your words and behavior, which in turn affects the people around you.
As I wrote about yesterday, Colonialism in many ways involves telling lies about entire nations and peoples, and using power, ruthlessness, and brutality to make them into almost-truths. After all, if you burn the manuscripts of an entire people and then tell them they have no history; if you make teaching what remains of their history illegal, is that not violence? Is that not genocide?
I’m sure there are those who would call that an exaggeration or hyperbole, but these are often the selfsame folks who are moved to violence to defend the idea the European history is populated entirely and without exception by people we in the U.S. would consider white today. We can pretend all we like that this vision of an all-white historical Europe came from nothing, no one, and nowhere, as if it is undiluted truth that comes to us untainted by centuries of colonialism. But the facts are that you can point to specific moments, authors, and articles that show the turning points; that show these ideas being born. You can read Race Mixture in the Roman Empire by Frank Tenney (from 1916) and see how articles like these shaped American views of race in antiquity; how the racism of 1916 was imposed onto Classical Antiquity. And these are the same people who decided that an entire continent did not have books, had no written history.
Why do we know what we know? Where does it come from? And how does the media we are creating today reflect it?

medievalpoc:

aresnergal:

medievalpoc:

lyricsja:

EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa

Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.

Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.

Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.

A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:

These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.

By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.

At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu.

By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s.

So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.

Also, as an additional consideration:

With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States.

Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.

It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

Fun fact: I only learned about that library by playing one of the Civilization games where it exists as a wonder

One of the many reasons why Medievalpoc is also about representation in all types of media.

One of the most important ways the past affects us all today is the media we create about it. History is a story, and a story bears the mark of each teller it passes through. So, each time we tell a story, we have the power to shape it as it passes through us, to others.

Whether we’re writing textbooks, fiction, or articles; sharing something on Facebook, teaching a class, playing a game, or texting our moms, we make choices in how we phrase things and frame information. When you hold things in your mind, like the Library of Timbuktu, and think about how it interacts with everything else you know, it will affect your words and behavior, which in turn affects the people around you.

As I wrote about yesterday, Colonialism in many ways involves telling lies about entire nations and peoples, and using power, ruthlessness, and brutality to make them into almost-truths. After all, if you burn the manuscripts of an entire people and then tell them they have no history; if you make teaching what remains of their history illegal, is that not violence? Is that not genocide?

I’m sure there are those who would call that an exaggeration or hyperbole, but these are often the selfsame folks who are moved to violence to defend the idea the European history is populated entirely and without exception by people we in the U.S. would consider white today. We can pretend all we like that this vision of an all-white historical Europe came from nothing, no one, and nowhere, as if it is undiluted truth that comes to us untainted by centuries of colonialism. But the facts are that you can point to specific moments, authors, and articles that show the turning points; that show these ideas being born. You can read Race Mixture in the Roman Empire by Frank Tenney (from 1916) and see how articles like these shaped American views of race in antiquity; how the racism of 1916 was imposed onto Classical Antiquity. And these are the same people who decided that an entire continent did not have books, had no written history.

Why do we know what we know? Where does it come from? And how does the media we are creating today reflect it?

Sep 1 '14

MCU Trauma Symposium: GOTG and the misfit as refugee

emilyenrose:

dignityisforotherpeople:

All the reviews of Guardians of the Galaxy mention the “ragtag band of misfits” trope, but none of them seem to have noticed how political this movie is. Not that it’s especially allegorical or polemical, it’s not. This is not a movie about how politics is, could be, or ought to be practiced, which is good, because I hate that kind of movie. Instead, despite the epic scale, this is a much smaller movie, about the effects of political trauma on individual life.

When you hear “band of misfits,” you assume you’re going to get some combination of fuckups and weirdos, and GOTG certainly delivers. They’re all different colors and species, engaged in variously illegal activities, with levels of merriment ranging from “stonefaced” to “maniacal.” But to stop there would be to miss the most important part. The emotional core of everyone on the team comes from their origin stories, which are: abducted from home by mercenaries, coerced into service of same; family killed by invading attackers; family killed by invading attackers, then coerced into service of same; abducted from home (or synthesized?) by shadowy experimenters and coerced into experiments in service of same; and Groot, whose origins are unclear but who is completely alone, except for Rocket.

These are not “dropped out of state school because I was partying too hard” stories, despite the lazy jokes about Quill sleeping around. These are stories of political violence and disenfranchisement. Our heroes belong not to the social category of fuckups but to a political category: refugees. By the time the movie starts, they’re a long way from being innocents, but those trajectories all started with being rendered helpless and alone. “Life takes more than it gives”: it’s taken their communities, their families, their autonomy.

This movie is about what it means to make something new for yourself, after what you have is taken. Petty larceny doesn’t cut it, grand larceny doesn’t cut it, even vengeance doesn’t cut it. There are only two things that really help: making your own family, and giving a shit, which turn out to be pretty close to the same thing.

Our heroes belong not to the social category of fuckups but to a political category: refugees.

Sep 1 '14

e-louise-bates:

pickeringtonlibrary:

LIBRARIANS

So true.  Kinda painful how true this is.

rockinlibrarian and meeichner, this is for you.

(Source: shiftglass)

Sep 1 '14
guardianofscrewingup:

elfpen:


It is times like this that I cans see no matter how cool he is about it and how cool he makes it look like, that foot still bothers Hiccup (and even Toothless) to no end … 
x

One of the details I loved the most about Hiccup’s animation in HtTYD2 is the fact that, despite the fact that he’s completely comfortable with it, his peg leg is still a peg leg, and obviously can’t move like a normal foot and do all of the same things. I don’t know if it really bothers hiccup at this point because he’s so used to it, but adding details to his movements, particularly when he’s getting himself up off the ground or here, maneuvering around rocks, and adding some stiffer details to say yeah in case you forgot that’s a fake leg, is just a really great way to talk about his disability without actually talking about it. Staying true to the character, all that. It’s nice.
It also adds to that dang son you got skills vibe because he does all this with a fake leg. Like. dang.

This is one of the things that makes me love how they portray disability in the canon so much. Disability is often portrayed in one of two ways in media, if it’s portrayed at all: 
1) The character is not a character and their entire story arc is about their disability. Personality? Personal goals? Who needs those when there’s overwrought drama and angst to wring from the character’s disability? 
That seems to be what the writers think when they write some characters with disabilities, anyway. Sometimes these stories can at least be good for people going through the process of dealing with their disabilities themselves, like when they first get them, develop them, or during times they’re really struggling,  but unfortunately, they can often other and dehumanize the character accidentally. It’s good they sometimes exist but it’d be bad if they were the only ones that exist.  
Then there’s 2) The disability superpower. Happens a lot with blind characters, especially, where some other sense(s) is/are heightened like Toph from Avatar: The Last Airbender, or Daredevil from Marvel Comics.
These characters are often allowed to actually HAVE character so they can be really enjoyable and hey, everyone deserves to see the type of person they are as some kind of superhero badass at some point, so it’s important they do exist sometimes. But for the average person - especially kids watching kid-oriented canons - their disability is not going to give them the magical ability to kick ass by mentally throwing rocks at people. 
That’s why it’s important characters like Hiccup exist too. They have a distinct personality, their own goals, and their disability is a part of them and something they have to adjust to, something they sometimes struggle with in terms of what they can do, but they try their best to deal with it and go about their lives. And the story is not about their disability.
It’s important that different types of stories about disabilities exist. Having the stories that are all about disability is important sometimes as a tool for adjusting to having them, especially for kids when they first develop them, get them by accident, or have times they really struggle with them.
Having stories with characters who are total badasses despite them or even because of them is important sometimes too, because everyone needs to see themselves as some kind of huge badass in the media sometimes. Maybe that’s not the reality sometimes, that a disability itself can be a strength, but that can be a nice feeling. 
But by that same token it’s important that characters like Hiccup exist as well, because they show the version that is closest to reality for a lot of people with disabilities, in that they are people first, with their own goals and own stories, but don’t negate the trouble disabilities can sometimes cause.  
He has trouble sometimes but he’s his own man and still gets shit done anyway. He still has the things he’s good at and parts of himself he can contribute to the world and ways he can internally grow and yes he has trouble sometimes but just deals with it, and that’s important to show, too.
He is a person living with it. He’s got shit he wants to do and it can sometimes be a pain in the ass in terms of mobility, but he deals with it. That’s the average person with a disability. Mental illness, physical disabilties, being on the spectrum, whatever it is, there are a lot of people out there that have them and are people first, and have to struggle with them, and they still have to get by and be themselves and try to do the things they want to do. 
And that’s why representation of people with disabilities needs to exist because there’s all different stories that can be told on that spectrum of possible stories that can be useful to people for them to see, in all different ways. 

guardianofscrewingup:

elfpen:

It is times like this that I cans see no matter how cool he is about it and how cool he makes it look like, that foot still bothers Hiccup (and even Toothless) to no end … 

x

One of the details I loved the most about Hiccup’s animation in HtTYD2 is the fact that, despite the fact that he’s completely comfortable with it, his peg leg is still a peg leg, and obviously can’t move like a normal foot and do all of the same things. I don’t know if it really bothers hiccup at this point because he’s so used to it, but adding details to his movements, particularly when he’s getting himself up off the ground or here, maneuvering around rocks, and adding some stiffer details to say yeah in case you forgot that’s a fake leg, is just a really great way to talk about his disability without actually talking about it. Staying true to the character, all that. It’s nice.

It also adds to that dang son you got skills vibe because he does all this with a fake leg. Like. dang.

This is one of the things that makes me love how they portray disability in the canon so much. Disability is often portrayed in one of two ways in media, if it’s portrayed at all: 

1) The character is not a character and their entire story arc is about their disability. Personality? Personal goals? Who needs those when there’s overwrought drama and angst to wring from the character’s disability? 

That seems to be what the writers think when they write some characters with disabilities, anyway. Sometimes these stories can at least be good for people going through the process of dealing with their disabilities themselves, like when they first get them, develop them, or during times they’re really struggling,  but unfortunately, they can often other and dehumanize the character accidentally. It’s good they sometimes exist but it’d be bad if they were the only ones that exist.  

Then there’s 2) The disability superpower. Happens a lot with blind characters, especially, where some other sense(s) is/are heightened like Toph from Avatar: The Last Airbender, or Daredevil from Marvel Comics.

These characters are often allowed to actually HAVE character so they can be really enjoyable and hey, everyone deserves to see the type of person they are as some kind of superhero badass at some point, so it’s important they do exist sometimes. But for the average person - especially kids watching kid-oriented canons - their disability is not going to give them the magical ability to kick ass by mentally throwing rocks at people. 

That’s why it’s important characters like Hiccup exist too. They have a distinct personality, their own goals, and their disability is a part of them and something they have to adjust to, something they sometimes struggle with in terms of what they can do, but they try their best to deal with it and go about their lives. And the story is not about their disability.

It’s important that different types of stories about disabilities exist. Having the stories that are all about disability is important sometimes as a tool for adjusting to having them, especially for kids when they first develop them, get them by accident, or have times they really struggle with them.

Having stories with characters who are total badasses despite them or even because of them is important sometimes too, because everyone needs to see themselves as some kind of huge badass in the media sometimes. Maybe that’s not the reality sometimes, that a disability itself can be a strength, but that can be a nice feeling. 

But by that same token it’s important that characters like Hiccup exist as well, because they show the version that is closest to reality for a lot of people with disabilities, in that they are people first, with their own goals and own stories, but don’t negate the trouble disabilities can sometimes cause.  

He has trouble sometimes but he’s his own man and still gets shit done anyway. He still has the things he’s good at and parts of himself he can contribute to the world and ways he can internally grow and yes he has trouble sometimes but just deals with it, and that’s important to show, too.

He is a person living with it. He’s got shit he wants to do and it can sometimes be a pain in the ass in terms of mobility, but he deals with it. That’s the average person with a disability. Mental illness, physical disabilties, being on the spectrum, whatever it is, there are a lot of people out there that have them and are people first, and have to struggle with them, and they still have to get by and be themselves and try to do the things they want to do. 

And that’s why representation of people with disabilities needs to exist because there’s all different stories that can be told on that spectrum of possible stories that can be useful to people for them to see, in all different ways. 

(Source: asbehsam)

Sep 1 '14
"Listening to the timbre of the conversations at the Dane County Farmers Market, one of the largest in the country, you’d think the topic was vaccination or Gaza. “What exactly is in this scone?” “Are your emus happy? How much space do they have to roam free?” “When you say ‘flour’ on the label, what kind of flour is that?”

Yet food pantries remain full of the same canned pumpkin and expired boxed meals they always have. Obese people are shamed and told what to eat, while people deemed skinny enough to have an eating disorder are also shamed for not taking care of their “health.” There is a serious disconnect here that should tell anyone who’s paying attention that this is not about justice or health in any form––it is about vanity.

When asking the server how the animal being served was prepared, no one seems to wonder whether that server has basic health insurance or whether that server is affected by the fact that the restaurant industry has one of the highest rates of sexual harassment and lowest rates of pay. When waxing poetic about the “salt of the Earth” farmers from which they buy their unpasteurized milk, no one seems to worry that an estimated 10 percent of American farm workers are children. When pearl-clutching over the things we “don’t know” about GMOs, as Kavin pointed out, no one seems to be concerned about their presence in groceries found at Price Rite––only products sold at Whole Foods.

If you are not as concerned about the people handing you your food in the restaurant as you are about the pigs on the farm where it was grown, your approach is classist….If you start telling someone all about your new trendy diet or asking them about theirs without knowing if they have an eating disorder that may be triggered by your prattle, your approach is ableist. If you tsk-tsk at people who are overweight for what they are eating and claim you’re concerned about their health, yet you’re not actively campaigning to make healthy food more accessible and affordable, your approach is sickening and I don’t want you in my activism."
Aug 31 '14
"You think asexuality is Human Relationships: Easy Mode, when it is far more apt to say that it is Human Relationships: What The Hell Is This Mode, Are There Even Other People Playing On This Level, Help, I Think I’m Alone Here And No One Will Believe Me."
Aug 31 '14
"If someone were to die at the age of 63 after a lifelong battle with MS or Sickle Cell, we’d all say they were a “fighter” or an “inspiration.” But when someone dies after a lifelong battle with severe mental illness and drug addiction, we say it was a tragedy and tell everyone “don’t be like him, please seek help.” That’s bullshit. Robin Williams sought help his entire life. He saw a psychiatrist. He quit drinking. He went to rehab. He did this for decades. That’s HOW he made it to 63. For some people, 63 is a fucking miracle. I know several people who didn’t make it past 23 and I’d do anything to have 40 more years with them."

anonymous reader on The Dish

One of the more helpful and insightful things I’ve seen about depression/suicide in the last couple of days.

(via mysweetetc)

THISSSS!!!!

(via thisisglorious)